How to Cook Wagyu Beef Brisket Steaks-Sous Vide Wagyu Experiment!

sous vide wagyu brisket steaks

Sharing is caring!

Sous Vide Wagyu Brisket Steaks

Today I’m doing something a little crazy. An experiment where I sous vide Wagyu brisket steaks! Yep, you heard that right! Sounds a little crazy and maybe it is? Follow along and find out if these wagyu brisket steaks turned out delicious when cooked under water!

Wagyu Brisket Steaks

Our friends at Wiens Wagyu sent us a full blood Wagyu brisket, and we broke it down into steaks
from the point to the flat. Now in a previous experiment, we tried to grill them. They turned out very tasty because it is Wagyu 100%… but they weren’t really that tender like you would expect with a high quality steak or even a well smoked brisket. So, rather than give up on the idea entirely, we asked the question, “What happens if we sous vide these puppies? Will they become more tender?” Well, there is only one way to find out.

Wagyu Brisket Steaks

When Braden Wiens called me with the idea of breaking down a 100% full blood Wagyu brisket, I was a little nervous. But that quickly turned in to figuring out where to even begin. I trimmed the brisket like I would if I were smoking it. Then removed the point from the flat to create two different types of Wagyu brisket steaks. Why? The fat in the point is a lot more prominent than in the flat. And we all know, the fat is where it’s at! So I wanted to see the difference between the two steaks and test them out with different cooking methods.

If you would like to try this experiment for yourself, or would like to just get some delicious Wagyu for yourself, visit Wien’s Wagyu website. Use code “RML” for a 10% discount on your first order!

Let’s Sous Vide These Steaks!

Look, I don’t do a ton of sous vide cooking on this channel. However, one of the best pork chops I have ever had was cooked with the sous vide method. So, I am going to test it out with these Wagyu brisket steaks and see what happens! Fingers crossed they turn out absolutely delicious. I am going to vacuum seal the steaks, drop them in the hot water at 135 degrees Fahrenheit, and let them cook for about two hours.

What could wrong, right? Right?!

After the wagyu brisket steaks have cooked for two hours, it’s time to pull them out. I cut them out of the packaging, pat them dry, seasoned lightly with salt, and threw them on the blazing hot Weber Kettle grill. I wanted to get a nice crust on these steak to really add more flavor.

Once the steaks are perfectly seared and rested, it’s time to cut into them! Remember to cut against the grain. Trust me, just do it. Unfortunately, these wagyu brisket steaks weren’t super easy to cut into. Which scares me into thinking that they aren’t going to be super tender.

The Results

Wagyu Brisket Flat Steak

Let’s start with the flat. Now, compared to the point, it does not have as much intramuscular fat. But maybe that’s not a bad thing. I cut this steak into really thin slices. Here’s the million dollar question – is it tasty?

The answer is yes! This cut is very tasty. It’s not quite as tender as a ribeye or filet, but is very similar to a top round. This would make a delicious roast beef sandwich and you are still getting the rich flavor of the Wagyu beef.

This is some really tasty Wagyu!

Wagyu Brisket Point Steak

Now it’s time to try the point. You can really see all of the intramuscular fat in there. However, it did not render down enough and was super chewy. Not melt in your mouth fat at all. And that’s no bueno. Maybe I didn’t cook this cut long enough? It still has the tasty flavor of the Wagyu, but the texture of the fat makes in virtually inedible.

As a matter of fact, this cut tasted better when we just through it on the grill instead of sous vide!

You Can’t Win ‘Em All

I would say this experiment was a wash. The flat steak turned our absolutely delicious. But the point steak was inedible. Where did I go wrong?! If I were to do this experiment differently, I would for sure sous vide the Wagyu brisket steaks for a much longer time. Low and slow is the name of the game! Lesson learned here. What would you do differently? Drop your ideas in the comments below!

As always, remember to subscribe to our YouTube channel so you never miss an experiment, recipe or quick cooking tips!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *